Who wants to live in a hospital?

It’s been a busy few weeks and I have had the great privilege to travel a lot across the country and speak to a lot of people about seniors care. The CMA’s message – that we need a national seniors strategy with Ottawa taking a leading role – is resonating with patients, their families, ordinary people, citizens’ organizations, and the press.

Radio interview on the Sean Leslie Show (CKNW Vancouver)

Windsor Star piece on CMA/CLC partnership on seniors care

I think that if we can fix seniors care, we will go a long way toward fixing the health care system in this country. And our health care system needs some fixing. According to the latest Commonwealth Fund Report, we rank next to last among 11 leading nations – only the US is worse. Many believe that with the introduction of Obamacare in the US, their value-for-dollar proposition will improve sufficiently to vault them above us.

I’m willing to bet that Canadians do not want to be at the bottom of any list that ranks national health care systems. Canadians highly value our health care system and the values upon which it was founded. It is an institution that is a big part of our national identity. So when a Commonwealth Fund Report measures quality (effective care, safe care, coordinated care and patient-centred care), access, efficiency, equity, and healthy lives and finds us next to the bottom of the pack, we need to take heed.

We need to spend smarter. We need to focus more on outcomes and quality, and less on volumes and activity. We need to serve and to be accountable to patients and their families rather than only to our institutions and structures.

Where to start? Well, let’s talk about how we can start to de-hospitalize the system.

Now, we will always need hospitals. Don’t get me wrong.

But increasingly, we need new ways to support seniors – so that they can age well at home, instead of as patients in hospitals. Today, between 15 and 20 percent of acute care hospital beds in Canada are occupied by patients – most of them seniors – who do not require acute care. We call them ALC (Alternate Level of Care) patients. They are in hospital simply because they have nowhere else to go. They are either on waiting lists for Long Term Care or they are waiting for a stretched home-care system to get the supports in place for them to be successful in their homes.

What are the consequences of this misalignment?

Well, first and foremost – seniors are not getting the care they need and deserve. Acute care hospitals are not designed or staffed to care for seniors with chronic disease. In hospitals, we put patients to bed – because that is what we do in acute care settings – we put sick people in bed. But these seniors are not acutely ill. They need a different kind of care environment. They need a care environment that lifts them up and restores them and helps them to live a dignified life. Not a small room with a bed and a chair, shared by 1-3 other people they don’t know, waiting for daily rounds by doctors and nurses who have nothing meaningful to contribute to them, warehoused while they wait for the next step in their care journey. What’s even worse is that we subject these seniors to a high risk of iatrogenesis. They fall. They develop hospital-acquired infections. They get deconditioned. They get depressed. Seniors with dementia suffer accelerated cognitive decline. The list goes on and on. It is a national embarrassment. Who wants to live in a hospital?

The other major consequence of this misalignment is that hospitals become full – and even overfull. Emergency Departments across the country are congested with long wait times for everyone. Elective surgeries get cancelled because there are no beds to put patients in afterwards. Tertiary care centres that offer highly specialized and complex care for regional populations can’t accept patients from smaller regional partner hospitals because they are full. Patients are put into “overcapacity” beds – hallways, alcoves, nooks and crannies and even closets sometimes. We call this situation and the slowdown in patient flow it causes, “Code Gridlock“. Increasingly, Code Gridlock is becoming the norm in hospitals across Canada.

Canadians are among the highest Emergency Department users in the industrialized world. (Osborn et al; 0.1377/hlthaff.2014.0947 HEALTH AFFAIRS 33, NO. 12 (2014)). At first glance, it might be tempting to say, “Hey, we just have to keep all these people with colds and minor ailments out of the ER – that will fix the overcrowding problem”. While it may be true that people with minor ailments should do their best to seek care elsewhere, doing so will not fix ER or hospital overcrowding nor will it fix what is wrong with seniors care. Having said that…. when seniors with multiple chronic illnesses come to the ER because there is nowhere else for them to go for their important but non-acute medical issue, they tend to be admitted to hospital more than they should. Why? Because that’s where the specialists are. Because that’s how you can get diagnostic testing fastest and easiest. One can understand the logic and the motivation. But that’s not what hospitals should be for. And when seniors get admitted to hospital, things often start to go wrong. Hospitals are toxic places for seniors who are not acutely ill. This is a tragically under appreciated fact.

We need to build a community-based infrastructure that provides access to teams that include primary care providers and specialists, rapid access to diagnostic testing and social services support. We need to reverse the trend of increasing poverty in seniors so that they don’t have to choose between their medications and food. We need to invest in affordable, safe housing for seniors. In short – we need to create a society that celebrates the triumph of aging – and that provides the care needed for seniors to age well at home. Chronic disease management doesn’t belong in the Emergency Department and on hospital wards. It belongs in the community where it can be delivered with higher quality, lower cost and better safety and efficacy.

In Canada right now, we have pockets of excellence and pockets of desperation. Only a national strategy that establishes a culture of relentless quality improvement through national standards and strategic, smart investments can get us where we need to go. How can we ever hope to improve without a plan? A national seniors strategy can leverage economy-of-scale efficiencies and help to share and scale-up successes. It can help to incorporate the social determinants of health and explore how tax policy and social programs can best be used to support seniors so they can age well at home.

Our partnerships with CARP, the Legion and The Canadian Labour Congress – among many others – reflects a growing consensus amongst a wide variety of stakeholders representing millions of Canadians. We need a national seniors strategy. All federal parties need to make this a key plank in their 2015 election platform.

CPAC footage – Canadians should watch this stuff!

I love CPAC like other people love the Weather Channel. To me, the discussions that happen behind the scenes – at the committee level and at other venues – is where opinions are formed and policy is generated.

Here are a couple of my recent CPAC “moments”.

The first is a media scrum at the Supreme Court – scroll ahead to 12:55. This was a piece on the landmark challenge to the law banning physician-assisted suicide.

The second is my appearance at the pre-budget consultations by the Parliamentary Committee on Finance (scroll ahead to 99:55 to hear my presentation and then you can see me field questions afterwards).

Do we actually influence policy makers? I like to hope so. Even if it is subtle. One must believe that they listen when we speak honestly and with authenticity on things that matter to Canadians.

 

Vangroovy!

One of the great things about this job is that I get to do a lot of travel across Canada and a chance to meet lots of fantastic people as we share ideas and experiences.

This week, it was Vancouver, and it was lovely. The sun was out, the weather was warm, and I had a blast.

My first stop was the University of British Columbia, where I met with Dr. Gavin Stuart, the Dean of Medicine.

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Dr. Stuart is in his 11th year as Dean – he is well-seasoned, wise, and a highly respected leader in BC as well as nationally and internationally. We talked a lot about medical education – particularly the new distributive model in BC (70% of BC doctors are now on faculty!) and the collective effort to improve access to care in rural and remote communities. We also talked a lot about medical professionalism; how our professionalism must extend beyond advocacy for our individual patients and more into advocacy for the system, for our communities and our country.

My next stop was the Vancouver Sun, where I met with members of the editorial board.

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We had a long, free-ranging discussion about seniors care. I told them the CMA intended to make seniors care a ballot issue in the next federal election. We need a plan, involving all levels of government, and with Ottawa taking the lead. The Sun was supportive, and published this editorial yesterday:

Vancouver Sun editorial (click here)

Next on agenda was a lovely evening with the Vancouver Medical Association, where I was privileged to serve as the 92nd Osler Lecturer.

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Osler said that the practice of medicine was an art, not a trade; a calling, not a business. Although Osler has made his mark in so many ways, what inspires me most from his teachings is the fact that he always sought to bring medical education to the bedside. He recognized the need to connect with patients at a human, personal level – to truly understand our patients and their lives so that we can contextualize their illnesses and therefore serve them best.

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I spoke about our seniors strategy and about our civic duty, as professionals, to work toward a better system; to be leaders in society and to keep our patients at the centre of everything we do and everything we stand for.

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One of the best parts of the evening was the chance to reconnect with my Dal Meds 1992 classmates, Drs. Scott MacDonald and Beata Byczko, who came out to hear the lecture!

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Thanks to Vancouver Medical Association President Jim Busser and all who helped to make the evening so special!

The next morning, I was off to visit with the Board of Directors of Doctors of BC (formerly the British Columbia Medical Association).

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We had a great discussion! Lots of alignments between Doctors of BC and the CMA. I emphasized how important the PTMAs are to CMA and that our strategy of engagement with the provincial and territorial medical associations meant a culture of continuous communication and feedback. Together, we are so much better than the sum of our parts.

Thank you, Vancouver!

Meeting with Justin Trudeau

Many thanks to Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and his staff for sitting down with us to discuss the urgent need to improve seniors care in Canada. Mr. Trudeau has committed to calling a First Ministers’ conference should his party be elected to government, and he agreed that seniors care is too important not to be on the agenda.

CS with JT

“Code Gridlock” and why we need a national seniors strategy

On Tuesday this week, it was my great privilege to address members of the Canadian Club of Ottawa at the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa. Thank you to Shannon Day Newman and the other members of the Board of Directors for inviting me to share my ideas.

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My message was that we need to address seniors care in this country. The reason? Well…. if we can fix seniors care, we will go a long way to fixing the health care system in Canada.

Today, seniors use about 45% of all the health care dollars spent in Canada. With the seniors population set to double over the next 15 years (and the 85+ population set to quadruple!) it’s not hard to do the math and realize that we are in big trouble unless we figure out how to do things very differently.

Here is the essence of the problem: Canada’s health care system was designed in the 1960s, when the average age of Canadians was 27. The health care landscape was one of acute disease. You got sick, you went to hospital, you got better, and you carried on.

Today, though, things are different. The average age is now 47. And the health care landscape is increasingly one of chronic disease. Diseases like arthritis, heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, heart failure, dementia, and diabetes; to name just a few.

Canadians’ health care problems are very different now, compared to 1960. But our health care system is still the same. It is too much about hospitals. We have a hospital-centric health care system.

I started my talk by telling the audience about “Code Gridlock“. (Click here for a written transcript of the Canadian Club Speech).

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At my hospital, Kingston General, we have made incredible improvements over the past 5 years. We have examined our processes carefully and have become extremely efficient. We balance our budget. Every dollar spent is subjected to incredible scrutiny. We have made tough decisions. Our doctors and nurses and other health care professionals are outstanding. Our leadership team is lean. We have won national and international awards for our organizational excellence; particularly our focus on patient and family-centred care. We are all proud to work here.

But, in October, we spent 18 days in gridlock.

And today, Nov 19, 2014, we are in our 26th consecutive day of gridlock.

Ambulances in gridlock

What does gridlock mean?

“Code Gridlock” was devised as a means to recognize that the hospital is so full with patients that patient flow has ground to a halt. The Emergency Department is packed to the gills. Elective surgeries are cancelled. Patients in partner community hospitals, who need to come for tertiary level services, just have to wait longer. The leadership team – usually focused on strategic goals, participates in an “all hands on deck” approach to problem solving – not inappropriately. The intent of “Code Gridlock” is to compel everyone – nurses, doctors, housekeepers, administrators – to go “above and beyond” to get patients safely discharged so we can get our new patients in.

A very reasonable strategy for a rare occurrence.

But here’s the problem: Its not a rare occurrence anymore. It is the new normal.

So what do we do?

The answers are not simple. But all the smart money is on the development of a national seniors strategy.

We need to find ways to better and increasingly serve our seniors – particularly those with chronic and not acute disease – in non-hospital settings: home support, community-based solutions, and quality, safe long term care facilities.

About fifteen percent of all acute care hospital beds in Canada are occupied by ALC (alternate level of care) patients – patients who are not acutely ill but who have no where else to go). We are warehousing these seniors in hospital beds – where they are more likely to suffer falls, to develop hospital-acquired infections, and to decondition. They should be in an environment that lifts them up, and restores. them; that allows them to live a dignified life.

A national strategy for seniors – that encompasses the full continuum of health care as well as determinants of health like housing, poverty, and the contributions of families – is the way forward. The federal government needs to be at the table.

————-Ottawa Citizen Story—————

—————-CBC Ottawa Story—————–

Is it unreasonable to expect our political leadership at the federal and provincial levels to sit down together to plan how we are going to address this huge problem that threatens to undermine the sustainability of the health care system in Canada?

Voters – challenge your federal candidates. Is their party committed to the development of a national seniors strategy? Mark your ballots accordingly.

 

Nanos Simpson Dodge

(Above) With pollster Nik Nanos and Queen’s University Chancellor Emeritus (and former Governor of the Bank of Canada) David Dodge just before the speech.

VIDEO LINKS TO THE CANADIAN CLUB SPEECH:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four